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Alaska Caribou Hunting

 

Alaska Caribou Hunting

Alaska is home to caribou herds spread across 16 management units. It is nearly impossible to predict when a herd will increase or decline. Luckily, the Department of Fish and Game is quick to respond and has measures in place to close hunts by emergency order and adjust quotas quickly. As is to be expected, non-resident hunt opportunities are some of the first to be cut and should be considered by all hunters planning a hunt more than a year beforehand.

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Currently, there are only a handful of units, 9D, 10 (Adak Island), 24A, 25A, 25B, 25D, and 26C, where a non-resident can harvest more than one bull caribou. However, the most popular units with plenty of transporter options fall within the one bull caribou bag limit.

The western Arctic herd, a staple for decades that had fallen on hard times, has seen an upswing in the last few years. The Western Arctic herd in unit 23 continues to offer the most popular non-resident hunting and is usually accessed out of the town of Kotzebue. There are multiple transporters and outfitters offering self-guided and fully-guided hunts throughout the range of this herd.

Alaska Caribou Draw & Season Dates

Most units are managed by over-the-counter permit options through general season harvest tickets. Alaska also offers six different draw hunts available to non-residents for this year. These draw hunts are listed in the table and are found in units 7, 13, 14, 15, and 20. Hunters drawing these permits should be prepared to hire an outfitter and/or transporter for their hunt.

Caribou Season runs from 8/10/21 to 12/31/21.

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Self Guided DIY Alaska Caribou Hunts

Self-guided drop-off hunts continue to gain popularity, and transporters are in no shortage. Most hunters seeking this option have generally looked to the Central Arctic, Western Arctic, and Porcupine herds in the northern portion of the state. A new General Season Caribou unit table is included to help hunters judge the pressure on caribou units when planning their hunts. When selecting a licensed transporter, we recommend checking multiple references and doing as much research as possible to ensure a positive experience before heading north.

 

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For access to all of our research and data we've collected over the last 20+ years, then join today and access the best research tools for hunting Caribou in Alaska including 3D Maps, Draw Odds, Consultations and much more. Go on more hunts with better information!

Private Land, Semi-Guided, and Guided Caribou Hunts in Alaska

Search our database of Alaska Caribou opportunities.

 

Application Dates for Caribou in Alaska

Alaska’s 2021-2022 application deadline is 5 P.M. (AKST) on December 15, 2020.

Our online/print magazine has everything in one location: Application info, draw details and odds, fees, hunter requirements, point structure, age restrictions, youth information, weapon restrictions, other tag opportunities, hunt planning and much more. If you would like access to all of our research join today!

Alaska Non-Resident Caribou Hunting Fees

2021-2022 Alaska Non-Resident Fees.
UP-FRONT FEES  
Annual Hunting License $160
Application Fee (each choice) $5
Application Fee (each choice, bison and muskox) $10
LOCKING-TAG FEES (Purchase Before Hunt)  
Dall Sheep Tag (Guide Required) $850
Brown/Grizzly Bear Tag (Guide Required) $1,000
Moose Tag $800
Mountain Goat Tag (Guide Required) $600
Bison Tag $900
Muskox Tag $2,200
Elk Tag $600
Deer Tag $300
Caribou Tag $650
Black Bear Tag $450
Wolf Tag $60
Wolverine Tag $350

 

Alaska Caribou Hunting Articles from Huntin' Fool Magazine